Tango Terminology

Tango

 

Tango Terminology

This list is part of an ongoing effort to educate and assist the friends and enthusiasts of the lovely dance called Tango.  It is intended to be used as a tool for students to use when encountering new or conflicting terms in class and should not be viewed as a final authority on the subject. 

 

Just a quick ref and thanks to this page from:
http://www.tejastango.com/terminology.html

Adorno
Adorno also Adornment or embellishment – mainly for the women – see The Art and Technique of Adornment – 


Amague

(from amagar – to make a threatening motion) a feint: An amague is used as an embellishment either led or done on one’s own, and may be used before taking a step. An example of an amague may be a beat (frappé) before taking a step.

    


Baldosa

Baldosa — A walking box figure named after the black & white checkerboard tile floors which are common in Buenos Aires.


Barrida

Barrida — A sweep; a sweeping motion: One partner’s foot sweeps the other’s foot and places it without losing contact. Barridas are done from either the outside or the inside of the foot of the receiving party.


Bandoneón

Bandoneón — An accordion like musical instrument originally created to provide missionaries with portable pipe organ music for religious services in remote locales which has been adopted by tango musicians to create the mournful and soulful sound of modern tango music.


Bicicleta
Bicicleta — Bicycle: A circular movement of the feet led by the man in the vertical plane with the couples feet pressed together as in a barrida.


Boleo

Boleo — From bolear – To throw: a boleo may be executed either high or low. Keeping the knees together, with one leg back, swivel and return on the supporting leg with a whipping action of the working leg. Sometimes spelled Voleo.
To see some great examples of Boleo’s go to:
http://thetangovideos.com/category/tango-boleos/


Cabeceo

Cabeceo — (from cabeza; head): Traditional technique for selecting dance partners from a distance at the milongas in Buenos Aires by using eye contact and head movements.


Cadena

Cadena — The chain; enchainement: An athletic and very theatrical turning figure which moves rapidly across the floor turning left or right, in which the couple alternate amagues (cuatros) or ganchos. Another variation involves the man stepping outside left or right in crossed feet and leading the lady in a change of direction to keep her in front of him as he turns, alternately going around her and bringing her around him.

Cadencia
Cadencia — A deep check and replace, usually led by the man as he steps forward left. Useful for avoiding collisions and making direction changes in small spaces. May also refer to a subtle shifting of weight from foot to foot in place and in time with the music done by the man before beginning a dance to give the lady the rhythm he intends to dance and to ensure that she will begin with him on the correct foot.

 

Caida
Caida — Fall: A step in which the man steps backward, sinks on his supporting leg, and crosses his working leg in front without weight while leading the lady to step forward in outside position, sink on her supporting leg and cross her working leg behind without weight. Caida may be done to either side.

 

Calesita
Calesita — Carousel; the merry-go-round: A figure in which the man places the lady on one foot with a lifting action of his frame and then dances around her while keeping her centered over, and pivoting on, her supporting leg.

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